BBC:
BBC News - Brazil builds giant Amazon observation tower

 77585931 006699129 1 - Giant Amazonian 'observation tower'

Construction has begun on a giant observation tower in the heart of the Amazon basin to monitor climate change.

The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory is expected to rise 325m from the ground.

Its instruments will gather data on greenhouse gases, aerosol particles and the weather in one of the largest continuous rain forests on the planet.

Brazilian and German scientists hope to use the data to better understand sources of greenhouse gases and answer questions on climate change.

The tower is being constructed out of steel that was brought thousands of kilometres from the south of Brazil by road and river raft to the site 170 km outside the Amazonian city of Manaus.

Because of its height, the tower will make it possible to investigate the alteration and movement of air masses through the forest over a distance of several hundred kilometres.

"The measurement point is widely without direct human influence, and therefore ideal to investigate the meaning of the forest region for the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere," said Jurgen Kesselmeier the project coordinator for the German side, quoted on the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz website.


Guardian:
Brazil building Amazon observation tower to monitor climate change impact | Environment | theguardian.com

Amazon rainforest 011 - Giant Amazonian 'observation tower'

Brazil is building a giant observation tower in the heart of the Amazon to monitor climate change and its impact on the region's sensitive ecosystem, a newspaper has reported.

The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory is a project of Brazil's National Institute of Amazonian Research and Germany's Max Planck Institute, O Estado de São Paulo said.

The tower, which will rise 325 metres from the ground, will be equipped with high-tech instruments and an observatory to monitor relationships between the jungle and the atmosphere. It will gather data on heat, water, carbon gas, winds, cloud formation, carbon absorption and weather patterns.

The project has been seven years in the making, with a site finally being selected far from any human presence, about 100 miles from Manaus, capital of the state of Amazonas, project coordinator Antonio Manzi told the newspaper.

The steel structure has been transported to the site on trucks and rafts from southern Brazil.

The Amazon jungle is one of the world's most sensitive ecosystems, with a powerful influence on the atmospheric release and intake of carbon.